The Wildlife of Bosque del Rio Tigre

Wildlife abounds everywhere you are. The variety is overwhelming. We have recorded most of the larger Osa species and many of the smaller species in our small reserve at Bosque del Rio Tigre.  Of course, many of the rare and/or shy mammal species are unlikely to be seen by someone just passing through, but there is always the possibility of a rare sighting.

One day a couple, here for general adventure travel, set out on a guided morning walk and encountered one of our pumas. TheMantled Howler Monkey on the Osa Peninsula and Corcovado National Park Ocelot trail is named so, because Abraham and a guest had just turned on the trail, not 20 meters from the lodge, and encountered an ocelot stalking a Little Tinamou (a primitive, almost flightless  species of understory bird). About six years ago, I was sitting in the lodge, Abraham was in the hammock , and I saw a grison (a fairly small, very rare to see weasel) run right past Abraham.  Another day a family decided to try out their luck with some recreational gold panning. After they were finished and were walking the 100 meters back to the lodge, they were blessed by the sight of an ocelot in full view, “frozen” on the beach across the river. We had a baird’s tapir walking our trails for a full “high” season. Although we never saw it, there were many tracks, evidence of forage,  and scat.

Guests regularly encounter tayras (a large black weasel), coatis (a long-nosed raccoon), agoutis, armadillos, pygmy squirrel, all four species of monkeys, and both species of sloth. Less frequently a neotropic river otter, red brocket deer, and peccaries are seen. Within the Osa region, our area is the best spot for observing birds and amphibians due to the diversity of habitat.

For the botanical enthusiast
There are plant species are too numerous to mention! Trees, shrubs, flowers, orchids, mushrooms, lichen,  of all shapes and forms can be found in just a small radius of anywhere on our property. We have the most primitive forms of plants around, such as cycads and fern trees, which have changed little since the day of the dinosaur.

Amphibians and Reptiles
We do have frogs…and frogs and even more frogs! There are five species of poison dart frog and many species each of tree or leaf frogs and litter frogs. We even have a couple species of salamander, although they’re rarely seen.  There are iguanas, three specie of native gecko (not those invasive imported ones you see all over the tropics), and many species of anoles, whiptails, and skinks. A wide diversity of snakes are here as well although much rarer to encounter.

Butterflies, Moths and Dragonflies
This is a haven for anyone looking for these species. Several of the top scientific specialists have visited our property over the years and have found many species they have never encountered. Occasionally, some of these species are either new species to science or species not yet recorded in Costa Rica.